Sean Rodrigues

Current Research



I joined Professor Wenshan Cai's research group at Georgia Tech in the Fall of 2013.
My work in the group has focused on chiral metamaterials and nonlinear photonic structures.

The GIF on the right demonstrates the ability of a chiral metamaterial to manipulate circular polarized light as it is changed from left circularly polarized to linear polarized to right circularly polarized. The square GT symbol is composed of two chiral enantiomers. You can learn more about these structures, their properties and their applications in my two first authored publications, see below.

Please visit our Lab's Website to learn more about our groups research in nanophotonics.

TNT Conference 2011

Publications

  1. S. Lan, Sean P. Rodrigues, M. Taghinejad, and Wenshan Cai, “Dark plasmonic modes in diatomic gratings for plasmoelectronics,” Laser & Photonics Reviews, in press (2017)
  2. Sean P. Rodrigues, S. Lan, L. Kang, Y. Cui, P. W. Panuski, S. Wang, A. M. Urbas, W. Cai, “Intensity-dependent modulation of optically active signals in a chiral metamaterial,” Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 14602 (2017)
  3. N. Zhang, W. Sun, Sean P. Rodrigues, K. Wang, Z. Gu, S. Wang, W. Cai, S. Xiao, Q. Song, “Highly Reproducible Organometallic Halide Perovskite Microdevices Based on Top-Down Lithography,” Advanced Materials, in press (2017)
  4. S. Lan, Sean P. Rodrigues, Y. Cui, L. Kang, W. Cai, “Electrically tunable harmonic generation of light from plasmonic structures in electrolytes,” Nano Letters, Vol. 16, No. 8, 5074-5079 (2016)
  5. S. Lan, Sean P. Rodrigues, L. Kang, W. Cai, “Visualizing optical phase anisotropy in black phosphorus,” ACS Photonics, Vol. 3, No. 7, 1176-1181 (2016)
  6. S. Lan, L. Kang, D. T. Schoen, Sean P. Rodrigues, Y. Cui, M. L. Brongersma, W. Cai, “Backward phase-matching for nonlinear optical generation in negative-index materials,” Nature Materials, Vol. 14, No. 8, 807-811 (2015)
  7. L. Kang, S. Lan, Y. Cui, Sean P. Rodrigues, Y. Liu, D. H. Werner, W. Cai, “An active metamaterial platform for chiral responsive optoelectronics,” Advanced Materials, Vol. 27, No. 29, 4377-4383 (2015)
  8. Sean P. Rodrigues. “Invisible,” Science, Vol. 348, No. 6241, 1307-1308 (2015)
  9. Sean P. Rodrigues, W. Cai, “Nonlinear optics: Tuning harmonics with excitons,” Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 10, No. 5, 387-388 (2015)
  10. Sean P. Rodrigues, Y. Cui, S. Lan, L. Kang, W. Cai, “Metamaterials enable chiral-selective enhancement of two-photon luminescence from quantum emitters,” Advanced Materials, Vol. 27, No. 6, 1124-1130 (2015)
  11. L. Kang, Y. Cui, S. Lan, Sean P. Rodrigues, W. Cai, “Electrifying photonic metamaterials for tunable nonlinear optics.” Nature Communications, Vol. 5, 4680 (2014)
  12. Sean P. Rodrigues, S. Lan, L. Kang, Y. Cui, W. Cai, “Nonlinear imaging and spectroscopy of chiral metamaterials,” Advanced Materials, Vol. 26, No. 35, 6157-6162 (2014)
  13. Y. Cui, L. Kang, S. Lan, Sean P. Rodrigues, W. Cai, “Giant chiral optical response from a twisted-arc metamaterial,” Nano Letters, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1021-1025 (2014)

Previous Research



Central Research & Development

My task focused on separating the components of a process feed of a renewably sourced biomaterial in order to gain a profit margin.



In Professor Lukas Novotny's Lab

University of Rochester, Fall 2011-Spring 2012

Lukas Novotny's lab is now located at ETH Zurich. My research with the group centered around generating a new method to fabricate nanopyramid shaped probes for AFM, STM and near-field optical spectroscopy. A paper that describes a portion of the work I did can be found here.


Professor Teri Odom's Lab

Northwestern University, Summer 2011

Under Professor Teri Odom and graduate student Wei Zhou I was able to design and fabricate a 2D array of nanoparticles submersed in a gain medium for potential use as a a nanoscale distributed feedback laser. Although our device demonstrated current-amplification curves, we ran out of time to demonstrate enhancement of the device. I presented this reearch at the Trends in Nanotechnology Conference 2011 in Spain and was awarded a Best Poster Award. Click here for a brief abstract on the research accumulated that summer.


In Professor Matthew Z. Yates's Lab

University of Rochester, Summer 2010

As a Xerox Research Fellow I worked in Matthew Z. Yates' fuel cell lab. My goal was to produce a thin electrolyte out of a hydroxyapatite material, by applying a series of water based deposition processes that begin with a seed layer of electroplating onto a titanium substrate.

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